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Narasimha Naidu September 3, 2006

Posted by Sai in Movies, Reviews, Telugu.
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17 comments

This was the third film starring Balakrishna that I saw in the theatre (after Aditya 369 and Bhairava Dweepam). Though I may not be a Balakrishna fan in general, I have no prejudice against him (and I liked him in Aditya 369, especially as Krishna Deva Raya). So I watched this movie after it started breaking all records. This was the first movie based on faction wars that I saw and I’d rate it as the best of the lot.

This was complete masala fare as usual from B. Gopal but was better than a lot of his other movies. The primary credit for that should go to Chinni Krishna who provided the story and screenplay for the movie. The basic idea of one warrior from every house brought freshness to the film.

The film has the flashback formula (made famous in movies appealing to the masses like Rajnikanth’s Basha) that has now become the standard format for faction movies and even others. The formula goes thus – hero is in hiding at the start of the movie and has a love interest and fights some villains establishing his power – towards the interval you find out that he has a flashback – the second half consists mainly of the flashback where he generally has another love interest or two even and of course a conflict with the main villains – after the flashback ends the climax of the movie starts. The love track between Preeti Jhangiani and Balakrishna was passable (and definitely of a higher quality than the one with Balakrishna and Simran in Samarasimha Reddy). What really worked in the movie were the two chase sequences apart from the punch in the dialogues (Parachuri Brothers). The first chase is the one with all the Sumos and the second chase is the one where he tries to save his brothers. Also the sentiment in the second half works for the female and family audiences. This was also an improvement over most masala movies.

Mani Sarma’s background score is the best one so far for mass movies that I’ve seen. The theme piece for Balakrishna was superb. It gave me incomparable josh (the theme from Chatrapathi scored by Keeravani gave me a similar feeling). The background score definitely elevated the events unfolding on screen. Mani Sarma is probably one of the best composers for mass songs and he undoubtedly provided one of his best mass soundtracks here. The movie also had some well choreographed dance sequences. Of course, no one can forget the unbearable classical dance by Balakrishna. There was no reason to include this in the movie and it definitely made Balakrishna look terribly bad.

This is masala movie with all the spices and nobody should expect it to be logical. It is made to cater mostly to the masses and fans and above all to make money. I still can’t figure out how some people feel that Balakrishna looks stupid while delivering those earth-shattering dialogues while they find it believable when Chiranjeevi does it in Indra. Chiranjeevi can bring rain in Indra but Balakrishna shouldn’t make a train go in reverse in Palanati Brahma Naidu. Both are implausible if not impossible. However, fans seem to throw logic to the winds if it is their favorite star while focusing only on logic when it is someone else. Double Standards! This movie is for those who can enjoy masala fare without taxing their brains (the obvious prerequisite being no prejudice against Balakrishna). Those who despise mass movies and those who want sensible fare should keep away from this movie.

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