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Hero March 6, 2009

Posted by Sai in Movies, Reviews, Telugu.
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Sometimes, you are stuck with the most godawful choice of recent Telugu movies. Sometimes, you are foolhardy and decide to try your luck. Sometimes, you are in such a generous mood that you try not to let anything dampen your spirit. Sometimes, there comes a time in life when you have to accept defeat. This is one such case.

So, Hero is the story of a …. well, let’s start from the beginning.

Rewind.

An honest anti-corruption bureau officer threatens to bring the hundred most corrupt people in the city to justice. This, he announces on a television channel post retirement. Now, he is the only one with the relevant information to brings these guys to justice. That makes it extremely easy for all the hundred concerned to get him killed with the suspicion pointing equally to another 99. What a dumba**! Yeah, Yeah, he gets killed by one of the hundred. Note that the film features only one of the hundred and I assume that the others don’t give a sh**.

Cut.

A youngster arrives in a villain’s den (it looks like the same one that is seen in every film) wearing a helmet and bashes a lot of goons. At first, when the youngster enters, you think, “Hmm, the guy looks smart. Could he be Nitin?”. And then the youngster starts moving and shaking and all the awkward movements point to the one and only Nitin.

Cut.

That was all a dream, apparently. His father, the police commisioner (Nagababu) wants to see him become a police officer. But his loud and supremely obnoxious mother (Kovai Sarala) wants to see him become a filmi “Hero”. She manages to make sure that he does not pass his bachelor’s degree that qualifies him for the job. We have to bear her antics for about ten minutes or so, while desperately trying to find something that can make you smile. No such luck.

Cut.

A television discussion between the Cops and the Public. The Cops claim that the Public is responsible for crime. The Public claims that the Cops are dishonest and corrupt. And they continue to indulge in this poorly directed, lame, uninteresting and unrealistic discussion till the Home Minister decides to intervene. He decides that, as Cops are dishonest and the Public does not know what it is to be a cop, any honest citizen can apply to be a cop (and he apparently passes a Government Order just because he wants to).

Cut.

The police academy sees all kinds of weird folk, none of whom can be classified as honest citizens, submitting applications including our very own “Hero” who wants to use the three-month training as a stepping stone to a future in films. Of course, it occurs to no one that the candidates should at least be evaluated for the only course requirement – honesty. Despite all evidence to the contrary in the case of everyone that shows up on screen, the forty worst candidates are selected to make sure that no one graduates from the course.

Stop.

I did watch the rest of what is the most uniformly ludicrous crap that I’ve seen in a long time but I won’t bore you with the details. Lest I forget, let me also mention that this film features a cellphone camera that has a 5 kilometer zoom. I am dead serious!

If you are still reading and you have a feeling that you should never watch this film, You Are Right. Don’t!

P.S. The film is written and directed by G.V. Sudhakar Kumar, who has been playing a goon in telugu films for a long time now. It seems that this mild career diversion was totally unwarranted but he must really possess great persuasive skills considering that he got someone to produce this film. Hopefully, he can go back to being a goon. Apart from Nitin, whose career is going further into the dumps with every outing (trust Ram Gopal Varma to sign him despite his lack of success or skills), the film also stars Bhavana in a largely irritating role. But special kudos to composer Mani Sarma, who had to actually create a background score for this film. Imagine having to watch this over and over while trying to compose suitable music! Was he smart enough to thumb off this assignment to one of his assistants?

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Comments»

1. Shujath - March 6, 2009

This Nitin guy actually gets to do more 3-4 big budget bombs every year. I wonder what makes producers splurge money on him. I read somewhere that his dad was some bigshot – must be pulling the right strings.

RGV obviously needed a dumb unknown face for a film like Agyaat and I guess Nitin fits the bill.

Anyways, the review was really funny…..feeling sorry for you though!

2. Anusha - March 6, 2009

Another notable feature in this movie is the pronunciation of the word ‘honesty’. Throughout the movie it is used at least 50 times and it is always pronounced “Hon-uh-stee”, (with an extra emphasis on the H, for the extra punch, I guess) 🙂


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